Blog

Lessons in Toolmaking

Check out this You Tube video of Dene Nahjo founding member Tania Larsson (Tetlit Gwich’in and Swedish), a student at the Institute of American Indian Arts (IAIA) in Santa Fe and 2015 participant in the Artist Leadership Program of the National Museum of the American Indian (NMAI), describes forging new tools modeled on 3D scans of tools in the museum’s collections. She also shares the worst lesson she ever learned about caring for tools.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YlVGWcngr-s&feature=youtu.be

 

tania_larsson

 

Indigenous Emerging Leadership Pilot Workshop

Emerging Indigenous leaders from across Canada’s Northern territories gathered in Dettah, NWT from December 4 to 5 to take part in a new pilot program that seeks to empower a new generation of leadership grounded in Northern Indigenous values and tradition.

The Northern Indigenous Leadership Program, under development by Dene Nahjo, is designed to challenge colonial notions of leadership, governance, politics, community and identity amongst youth from various Nations across the North, and enable emerging leaders to put those values into practice. It is expected to be rolled out across the North in the new year.

“Dene Nahjo is committed to professional development as a means of constant improvement,” said Dene Nahjo Project Director Iris Catholique. “Leadership roles and values are ever evolving. Staying grounded in our Elders’ teachings and experience while discussing modern techniques for action will prepare Northern emerging leaders to face real issues in today’s world.”

Invited participants from groups like Our Voices, ReMatriate and Dene Nahjo, along with Jane Glassco fellowship alumni and members of various First Nations, attended the gathering where they heard from current and former Indigenous leaders, politicians, Elders and academics.

Sessions focused on the topics of Indigenous leadership values, Indigenous leadership in action, gender dynamics in Indigenous politics, Indigenous nationhood, sovereignty and self-determination, and the history of colonialism in Canada. Workshops were also complemented by facilitated skill-building sessions.

“Elders and leaders were very supportive of the work we are doing, and the group left with a common understanding of nationhood building and actions required,” said Nina Larsson, a member of Dene Nahjo’s steering committee. “We look forward to working with Nations across our three Northern territories to deliver this program fitted for their specific cultures and traditional knowledge.”

Dene Nahjo is a new generation of leaders and community builders working to advance social and environmental justice for northern peoples and promote indigenous leadership. By living, learning and celebrating our culture on the land through the guidance of elders, we strive to foster emerging leaders, strengthen relationships and create long-term, positive change in the North.

Dene Nahjo’s mission is to advance social and environmental justice for Northern peoples while promoting Indigenous leadership by fostering emerging leaders. We strive to live, learn and celebrate our cultures, languages and Indigenous values on the land, guided by our Elders, to strengthen relationships in the North and create long-term, positive change. Dene Nahjo’s vision is Land, Language and Culture, Forever.

Next Steps

Dene Nahjo is planning to host a facilitation certification training program in April 2016 for its founding members and invited participants from all the regions of the north. The four-day training program will provide the tools to bring the Indigenous Emerging Leadership Program to all NWT regions and communities. The Indigenous Emerging Leadership Program is being finalized and will be formatted into 2-4 modules. Once finalized, program information will be available to the public on our webpage. Outreach in the communities is planned for 2016-2017.

If you are interested in obtaining further information on the program, contact us at Dene Nahjo at denenahjo@gmail.com or by telephone at (867) 444-3363.

The Gender and Public Sector Leadership

 

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On January 21, 2016 IPAC-NWT and Dene Nahjo held a panel discussion moderated by Nina Larsson, author of “Mind the Gender Gap” (2015) & Founding Member of Dene Nahjo, a policy paper published through the Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship.

“Mind the Gender Gap” is a policy analysis which identifies ways in which the GNWT can ensure that Indigenous women have access to and occupy decision making roles. Drawing on the Scandinavian model, this report shines light on gender equality in the Northwest Territories (NWT) public sector. To address the lack of diversity and inclusion in senior management positions, the report examines gender equality policy; the representation of Indigenous women in senior management positions; and breaking the barriers to work/life balance.

The Gender and Public Sector Leadership in the NWT event examined and expanded on the issues put forward in “Mind the Gender Gap” by presenting current GNWT initiatives, visions for the future, and the lessons and best practices that can be drawn from the lived experiences of Indigenous women in the public service.

Read the policy paper here:
http://gordonfoundation.ca/sites/default/files/publications/MindTheGenderGap_NinaLarsson.compressed.pdf

You can check out the full-length recording of the January 21, 2016 event held with Dene Nahjo & IPAC on Gender and Public Sector Leadership in the NWT on this YouTube channel. You can find it, and recordings of other recent events here.

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCLtxjgtUuk6EmWDvTWlN7_Q

You can also provide feedback about the event held @DeneNahjo on gender? We want to hear from you – please take a quick survey: https://t.co/vKY76AwQtK1

Bush Gear Kit List

Canvas Backpack

This bag was made by my late grandmother, Julie Mackenzie. I actually don’t use this bag much because I want to save it. Canvas bags are great in cold weather.

The Always Ready To Go Bush Kit

 

My buddy Nina here at Dene Nahjo has been asking me for list of gear to put together for her very own bush kit. So I thought, ‘Hey let’s make it a blog post.’

 

So first what is a bush kit?

 

Well for me, I have a set of items that always come into the bush with me and when in the bush, the items almost always come with me in even the short excursions from camp. The reason is you never know what can happen in the bush and there are a couple of things that will always been useful. It might even save your life.

 

The number #1 most important item to me is a good knife. Everything after a knife is a bonus.

 

Here’s the list:

 

            1. Knife: A hunting appropriate knife, can be a folding blade or not, but it is important to have a knife that can take abuse.
            2. Matches: In a waterproof container or ziplock baggy.
            3. Backpack: One designated daypack sized bag. It will hold all the other items on the list. (And over the years, I have found it best to have one backpack specifically as your bush kit, because everything is always ready to go and easily stored when you are at home.)
            4. Water bottle or thermos: Water intake is super important in the bush. A well hydrated body helps you make the best decisions in the bush and dehydration can cause you all kinds of problems. Hot tea is the best alternative to plain water. 
            5. Tea bags and sugar
            6. Salt
            7. A small pot: To make tea or other things
            8. Snare wire
            9. A multi-tool
            10. A hatchet (small axe) or a machete, (the machete type of blade has become my preference over an axe.)
            11. Axe file or a good knife sharpener. (I usually have both.)
            12. A small first-aid kit
            13. Ibuprofen
            14. About 20 ft of rope

 

 

That for the most part are the essentials but in my backpack I also have these optional items:

 

                        1. One pair of spare socks
                        2. A dry wool t-shirt
                        3. Protein bar
                        4. Trail mix
                        5. Additional knives
                        6. GPS (I carry it but actually never use it, I found it better to just pay attention to the land and landmarks.)
                        7. Bandana
                        8. Lip Balm
                        9. Sun screen
                        10. Fish line and fish hook
                        11. Sat phone, Spot Messenger or InReach Device
                        12. Map of area
                        13. Camera (the land is beautiful and it is fun to take photos)
So I think that about does it. I almost always have my bullets for my rifle or shotgun in the backpack but that should only be in your bag if you have the proper gun/safety knowledge.
I also have found that there are a lot of items on list. It can be maybe too much stuff for your comfort level but to narrow the list, get out on the land more. Experience is the best teacher and being out on the land more will help you decide what you need or don’t need in your bush kit.

 

Enjoy the bush ; )

-Amos
Bush gear

Bush gear

Dene Nahjo’s Kyla Kakfwi-Scott speaks at Gordon Foundation’s 50th anniversary

Dene Nahjo co-founder and steering committee member Kyla Kakfwi-Scott was one of the speakers invited to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Walter and Duncan Gordon Foundation on December 1 in Ottawa.

In her speech, Kyla, a Jane Glassco Northern Fellowship alumnus, spoke about Dene Nahjo and gave shout-outs to fellow northern groups and institutions, like the Dechinta Centre for Research and LearningOur Voices and Qanak. The Day of Dialogue presentations were intended to identify unique approaches to addressing community needs in the North.

You can watch the full afternoon program below. Kyla’s speech starts at 38:42, and her concluding remarks are at 1:19:50.

(Photo credit: The Gordon Foundation)

Dene Nahjo’s Melaw Nakehk’o makes Hollywood red carpet debut

Dene Nahjo founding member Melaw Nakehk’o made her red carpet debut in Hollywood last night at the world premiere of The Revenant, a new film starring Leonardo DiCaprio and directed by Alejandro Iñárritu.

It was the first film for Nahehk’o, a Dehcho and Denesuline Dene artist and mother from Liidlii Kue (Fort Simpson) in Denendeh (Northwest Territories). She plays the lead female role of Powaqa, the kidnapped daughter of an Arikara warrior.

On the red carpet, Nakehk’o modelled a dress resulting from a recent collaboration between Indigenous artist Christi Belcourt with Italian design house Valentino, along with jewelry by Keri Ataumbi of Ataumbi Metalsalso an Indigenous artist from Santa Fe.

During interviews, Nakehk’o spoke about the importance of supporting “culturally appropriate collaborations” between Indigenous artists and fashion designers, calling out the cultural theft that often takes place when designers become “inspired” by Indigenous arts and fail to give credit.

Nakehk’o also spoke to the epidemic of missing and murdered Indigenous women in North America. When asked how she prepared for her first-ever role as Powaqa, she said it was through honouring the lives of Indigenous women, who are subjected to disproportionate levels of violence.

Watch her red carpet interview here:

Despite it being her acting debut, Nakehk’o’s performance has also garnered positive reviews, including this statement from producer Mary Parent in a recent interview:

And there’s the Native American daughter, kidnapped by French explorers, and rescued by Glass. The latter lady (Melaw Nakehk’o) plays a crucial part in the end of the film, saving his life with one icy look.

“You think it won’t end well. But it’s one of my favorite shots in the movie. You see the integrity and the honor and the quid pro quo. She’s got this strength and this nobility and she found her way home,” says producer Mary Parent.

Read Nakehk’o’s interview with CBC North Trail’s End host Lawrence Nayally:

N.W.T.’s Melaw Nakeh’ko makes her Hollywood debut in The Revenant

More photos from the evening:

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Actress Melaw Nakehk’o attends the premiere of 20th Century Fox’s “The Revenant” at TCL Chinese Theatre on December 16, 2015 in Hollywood, California. (Dec. 15, 2015 – Source: Jason Kempin/Getty Images North America)

Melaw Nakehk'o with co-star Leonardo DiCaprio. Photo courtesy of Melaw Nakehk'o.

Melaw Nakehk’o with co-star Leonardo DiCaprio. Photo courtesy of Melaw Nakehk’o.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: TCL Chinese Theatres. https://www.instagram.com/p/_YJJ67w7Kn/

Photo credit: TCL Chinese Theatres. https://www.instagram.com/p/_YJJ67w7Kn/

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Melaw Nakehk'o with co-star Tom Hardy. Photo courtesy of Melaw Nakehk'o.

Melaw Nakehk’o with co-star Tom Hardy. Photo courtesy of Melaw Nakehk’o.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Photo credit: Amos Scott, https://www.instagram.com/p/_YQc86wwSu/?taken-by=adzestudios

Photo credit: Amos Scott, https://www.instagram.com/p/_YQc86wwSu/?taken-by=adzestudios

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Watch the trailer for the film:

Dene Nahjo fosters emerging Indigenous leadership with new pilot program

Emerging Indigenous leaders from across Canada’s Northern territories gathered in Dettah, NWT on December 4 to 5 to take part in a new pilot program that seeks to empower a new generation of leadership grounded in Northern Indigenous values and tradition.

The Northern Indigenous Leadership Program, under development by Dene Nahjo, is designed to challenge colonial notions of leadership, governance, politics, community and identity amongst youth from various Nations across the North, and enable emerging leaders to put those values into practice. It is expected to be rolled out across the North in the new year.

“Dene Nahjo is committed to professional development as a means of constant improvement,” said Dene Nahjo Project Director Iris Catholique. “Leadership roles and values are ever evolving. Staying grounded in our Elders’ teachings and experience while discussing modern techniques for action will prepare Northern emerging leaders to face real issues in today’s world.”

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Leadership program participants play Dene hand games at the Chief Drygeese Centre in Dettah. Photo: Jordan Peterson, Our Voices.

Invited participants from groups like Our Voices, ReMatriate and Dene Nahjo, along with Jane Glassco fellowship alumni and members of various First Nations, attended the gathering where they heard from current and former Indigenous leaders, politicians, Elders and academics.

Sessions focused on the topics of Indigenous leadership values, Indigenous leadership in action, gender dynamics in Indigenous politics, Indigenous nationhood, sovereignty and self-determination, and the history of colonialism in Canada. Workshops were also complemented by facilitated skill-building sessions.

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Facilitator and Dene Nahjo founding member Mandee McDonald led the skill-building component of each workshop. Photo: Jordan Peterson, Our Voices.

“Elders and leaders were very supportive of the work we are doing, and the group left with a common understanding of nationhood building and actions required,” said Nina Larsson, a member of Dene Nahjo’s steering committee. “We look forward to working with Nations across our three Northern territories to deliver this program fitted for their specific cultures and traditional knowledge.”

Dene Nahjo’s mission is to advance social and environmental justice for Northern peoples while promoting Indigenous leadership by fostering emerging leaders. We strive to live, learn and celebrate our cultures, languages and Indigenous values on the land, guided by our Elders, to strengthen relationships in the North and create long-term, positive change. Dene Nahjo’s vision is Land, Language and Culture, Forever.

For more information, please contact:

Iris Catholique
Dene Nahjo Project Director
867-445-3363
denenahjo@gmail.com

 

Celebrate Indigenous art at Dene Nahjo’s Winter Market!

Distinctly, uniquely Indigenous works by local artists, artisans and designers will be showcased and available for sale in Yellowknife at the Dene Nahjo Winter Market on December 20, 2015. The winter arts and crafts sale will be open from 12:00 p.m. to 6:00 p.m. at the Champagne Room, 50-50 Mini Mall, Yellowknife, NWT.

Admission is free and everyone is welcome.

Featured artists, diverse in their artistic expressions, both traditional and contemporary, all have a commitment to excellence, pride in their heritage, and enthusiasm about sharing their culture through their art.

The Dene Nahjo Market will also feature DJ Eugene Boulanger who will tantalize the crowd with his fun music.

We are thrilled to present the very best of who we are as Indigenous artists to the Northern community. Come celebrate who we are as Indigenous people and get in the mood for the Holiday Season.

We have a few tables left for local artists to book their tables. Cost: $30.00.

Some of the Participating Artists:
Tania Larsson
Melaw Nakehk’o
Hovak Johnston
– Peyton Straker (Savage Salvage Jewellery)
– Angela Jack (Kamâmak)
– Gloria Shearing (Enzoes Jewellery)
John Rombough
Sharon Firth
Kiera Kolson

For the latest updates, please visit our Facebook page.

Contact:
Iris Catholique
Tel: 867-444-3363
Email: denenahjo@gmail.com

Dr. Marie Wilson speaks on Truth, Reconciliation and Policy Change in Canada

If you missed Tuesday’s event featuring Dr. Marie Wilson of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Yellowknife, our co-host, the NWT chapter of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC NWT), has published a video of the talk to view online.

 

The event was also covered by EDGE YK online.

Dr. Marie Wilson speaks about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and policy change in Canada on Nov. 10 at the Great Hall of the NWT Legislative Assembly. Photo: Mark Rendell, EDGE YK

Dr. Marie Wilson speaks about the Truth and Reconciliation Commission and policy change in Canada on Nov. 10 at the Great Hall of the NWT Legislative Assembly. Photo: Mark Rendell, EDGE YK

REMEMBRANCE, TRUTH AND RECONCILIATION

A timely reminder about some essential truths of Canadian history and nation-building.

By Mark Rendell, EDGE YK

Pinned to the lapel of Dr. Marie Wilson’s jacket as she spoke to a large audience in the great hall of the Legislative Assembly was a poppy. But instead of the plain black circle usually at the flower’s centre, hers had a gold pin, etched with a circle of flames – the symbol of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, for which she was one of the commissioners.  

“As you all know we’re in a season of remembrance, and like many people I’ll spend tomorrow and all the days of this week… in loving remembrance of my father, my grandfather, many uncles and many family friends who spent key years of their own youth in the midst of great and terrible wars,” said Wilson, explaining the twin meaning of her poppy. “But I want to symbolize that there are other conflicts that belong to this country. Ones that still wait to be remembered.”

Wilson’s speech, the climax of an event organized by Dene Nahjo and the NWT Institute of Public Administration of Canada, dealt with many things: the strength of residential school survivors and their essential role in forcing the government’s apology and financial restitution, how public policy can and should be informed by a willingness to listen to Indigenous voices. But coming the day before Remembrance Day, perhaps most striking were her reflections on our history and the collective duty we have to remember.

“Before anyone says too quickly that there’s no comparison between [residential schools] and war… let us also remember together in this moment the conservatively estimated 4000 little children who died in those residential schools or shortly after leaving them. In some cases parents also died before ever finding out what happened to their child, the cause of death or even where they were buried, and some families still live with that unknown.”

Read the full story here.

 

Amos Scott featured in Aboriginal Business Quarterly

Dene Nahjo founding member Amos Scott, a member of the Tlicho Nation based in Yellowknife, is featured in the newest issue of Aboriginal Business Quarterly magazine in their salute to entrepreneurs.

The video journalist and photographer behind the acclaimed television series Dene A Journey recently founded his own company, Adze Studios.

Check out the story on page 42 of the magazine.

The Indian Residential Schools Truth, Reconciliation and Policy Change in Canada: Dr. Marie Wilson, TRC Commissioner

Dene Nahjo is proud to partner with the NWT Regional Group of the Institute of Public Administration of Canada (IPAC NWT) to host a presentation by Dr. Marie Wilson on her experience as Commissioner with the Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) of Canada.

The TRC was mandated in part to prepare a comprehensive historical record on the policies and operations of the Indian Residential Schools and produce a report including recommendations concerning the school system and its legacy.  

After six years of comprehensive research and engagement, on June 2, 2015 the Commissioners issued a summary report and 94 ‘Calls to Action’, directed at all levels of government in Canada, intended to redress the legacy of residential schools and advance the process of reconciliation.

In terms of achieving policy change, other past public commissions in Canada have had mixed results.  In this session, Commissioner Marie Wilson will discuss the role of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, the purpose of the ‘Calls to Action’, what is necessary in order for them to achieve effective policy change in Canada, and the prospects of this occurring.

“As a community of public administrators in Canada, it is essential that we understand the legacy of Indian Residential Schools on the work that we do in every domain of government.  The Truth and Reconciliation Commission has done immeasurable service in bringing to light that dark history and identifying 94 ‘Calls to Action’ for Canadians to move forward on the path of reconciliation. IPAC-NWT is pleased to partner with Dene Nahjo on this important event,” says Christian Bertelsen, IPAC NWT Chair.

“Dene Nahjo is proud to partner with IPAC-NWT in highlighting the importance of implementing the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission through public policy in Canada,” says Nina Larsson, a member of Dene Nahjo’s steering committee. “We deeply value the work of the TRC and the contributions of Dr. Marie Wilson to the country and the North, and encourage all those who have not read the final TRC report and its 94 recommendations to do so.”

The event will take place November 10 from 12 to 1:30 p.m. at the Great Hall of the NWT Legislature. Attendees are asked to register online. Tickets are $20 for non-IPAC members.

All individuals with an interest in public service are welcomed to attend. This event is free for members of Dene Nahjo, IPAC and the Yellowknives Dene First Nations. Registration for non-members is $20 payable at the time of registration.

If you cannot attend, please consider following IPAC NWT on Twitter for live-tweeting of the event. This event will be recorded and posted on IPAC NWT’s YouTube Channel

Register here

 

Background:

marie wilsonDr. Marie Wilson brings to her role as Commissioner more than 30 years of experience as an award-winning journalist, trainer, and senior executive manager. She has also been a university lecturer, a high school teacher in Africa, a senior executive manager in both federal and territorial Crown Corporations, and an independent consultant in journalism, program evaluation, and project management.

As a journalist, Ms. Wilson worked in print, radio and television as a regional and national reporter. She was the first host of the Canadian Broadcasting Corporation flagship television program, Focus North, and the corporation’s senior manager for northern Quebec and the northern Territories. As a Regional Director for the CBC, she launched the first daily television news service for northern Canada, and developed the Arctic Winter Games and True North Concert series. She delivered training through the South African Broadcasting Corporation during that country’s transition to democracy, and served as an associate board member of what became the Aboriginal Peoples Television Network, APTN. Ms. Wilson is the recipient of many awards including an honorary Doctor of Laws degree from St. Thomas University in Fredericton, NB. She speaks English and French. Ms. Wilson and her husband Stephen Kakfwi have three children and four grandchildren.

 

ipac-logoIPAC is the premier organization in Canada dedicated to excellence in public service. With 17 regional groups across the country, IPAC brings together public servants from all orders of government as well as academics and students of public administration. The purpose of the NWT Regional Group is to nurture excellence in public service in the Northwest Territories. It is an impartial and representative local forum that is part of a national and international network of practitioners and scholars. IPAC recently published a book entitled Commissions of Inquiry and Policy Change that explores questions around why some commissions of inquiry result in policy changes and others do not.

 

Screen Shot 2015-10-23 at 2.30.30 PMDene Nahjo is a new generation of leaders and community builders working to advance social and environmental justice for northern peoples and promote indigenous leadership. By living, learning and celebrating our culture on the land through the guidance of elders, we strive to foster emerging leaders, strengthen relationships and create long-term, positive change in the North.

Dene Nahjo’s Daniel T’Seleie talks solar energy, cultural revitalization and climate change

Daniel T'Seleie works on a hide at Nitainlaii near the Peel River on Gwich'in territory during a Dene Nahjo hide tanning camp in 2014. Photo: Tania Larsson

Daniel T’Seleie works on a hide at Nitainlaii near the Peel River on Gwich’in territory during a Dene Nahjo hide tanning camp in 2014. Photo: Tania Larsson

Dene Nahjo founding member Daniel T’Seleie is making the news this week with his campaign to help bring solar energy to communities in Denendeh.

T’Seleie, who is K’asho Got’ine Dene from Radili Ko/Fort Good Hope, believes that by harnessing the power of the sun, indigenous communities can gain independence as nations, engage in a cultural resurgence movement that is tied to the land and combat climate change.

“A huge aspect of our lives, culture and language is lost when we can’t be on the land,” he said. “For me, that’s one of the biggest threats of climate change.”

 

 

Reuters reports:

Solar panels empower indigenous people in Canada’s north

Green energy activist Daniel T'Seleie, who believes northern Canada could improve its energy security by investing in more solar panels, is pictured outside Bechoko, Northwest Territories in this September 30, 2015 file photo. REUTERS/Chris Arsenault/Thomson Reuters Foundation/Files

Green energy activist Daniel T’Seleie, who believes northern Canada could improve its energy security by investing in more solar panels, is pictured outside Bechoko, Northwest Territories in this September 30, 2015 file photo. REUTERS/Chris Arsenault/Thomson Reuters Foundation/Files

BEHCHOKO, Northwest Territories, Canada (Thomson Reuters Foundation) – Daniel T’seleie, an indigenous activist in Canada’s far north, is campaigning to help his people wean themselves from a worrying dependence on imported fuel and food, recover old traditions and win greater autonomy from the government.

“Right now a lot of communities in the Northwest Territories are dependent on diesel-generated electricity, along with store-bought food,” said T’seleie in an open air interview near Behchoko, a clutch of small wooden houses nestled along the shores of Great Slave Lake.

Standing beside spindly jack pine trees growing from thin soil on the hard granite rock that covers much of northern Canada, T’seleie sees renewable energy as the force which could respond to the region’s complex, intertwined challenges.

Read the full story here: Solar panels empower indigenous people in Canada’s north

 

 

 

 

Dene Nahjo NWT Election Forum, Nov. 4-5

OEqb7zQ7GFidA70zWdcSn1McHuTomnairOs44D6qaQo,MMq8km6l9IiRSn3RC7XQu9i0Q0ehnwgXiz5IYQJnasIDene Nahjo is hosting a forum for Yellowknife candidates in the upcoming territorial election focused on issues important to Indigenous people across the territory.

The forum will take place November 4 and 5 from 6-9 p.m. at the Tree of Peace Friendship Centre in Yellowknife.

Due to the volume of candidates running for seats in Yellowknife, the forum will be split up over two evenings and candidates will only be asked to participate at one event. The evenings will be divided based on districts so that candidates running in the same area will be featured on the same night.

Wednesday, November 4:

Frame Lake
Great Slave
Kam Lake
Range Lake

Thursday, November 5:

Yellowknife North
Yellowknife Centre
Yellowknife South
Tu Nedhe Weledeh

We want to know what questions you have for candidates and what issues you want to see made a priority during the lead-up to the 2015 NWT Election on November 23.

Please submit your comments and questions to:

Meagan Wohlberg

mcwohlberg@gmail.com

Deadline to submit: October 30

We have a new director!

Dene Nahjo is proud to introduce its new project director, Iris Catholique.

Iris Catholique, Dene Nahjo Project Director

Iris Catholique, Dene Nahjo Project Director

Catholique, a member and former administrator of the Lutsel K’e Dene First Nation, recently relocated to Yellowknife to take on the role and is thrilled to announce a variety of initiatives underway for the fall and winter throughout the territory, including:

  • Territorial candidates forum focused on Indigenous issues, scheduled for November 4-5;
  • Hide tanning and traditional tool making workshops;
  • 2016 Emerging Indigenous Leadership Conference;
  • The establishment of a Northern Cultural and Social Innovation Centre;
  • Women’s hunting program and second Indigenous Circumpolar Women’s Gathering;
  • Healthy masculinity program and Indigenous Men’s Gathering; and much more.

“Keeping the Dene culture alive within our people and our communities is what I want to see accomplished,” Catholique says. “There is a gap in this generation where we have lost so much information and teachings due to the displacement of our people in residential schools. We need a place and an organization like Dene Nahjo to keep the teachings of our Elders alive through workshops and gatherings, where we can ensure our traditional arts, skills, and knowledge are not lost.”

To get in touch with Iris, contact her at:

Cell: 1 867 444 3363

Email: contact@denenahjo.com